Budget airlines 'poisoning' their own wells?

Europe's budget airlines may be 'poisoning their own wells' by focusing on keeping costs as low as possible and not 'nurturing' key staff including pilots, commentators say.

Many airlines won't pay for pilot training - which in Europe can cost over GBP100,000 in total - and coupled with university debts and low entry-level pilot wages, it can be difficult for would-be pilots to qualify. They can apply for bank loans, but can't work as a pilot in the year it takes to gain their Airline Transport Pilots Licence (ATPL), which is needed to fly a commercial jet.
Also, young pilots at budget airlines (such as Monarch*, which failed earlier this week) may only be paid between GBP20,000 and GBP22,000 a year.
And of course, although there is a global pilot shortage, pilot licences are not transferable between aircraft types; pilots can't switch from one to another - they have to retrain to fly each new jet type.

Monarch passengers 'coming home'

By Monday evening October 2, the repatriation of UK passengers from their holiday destinations had begun, with some 12,000 passengers flying into UK airports.
Officials have chartered about 30 planes to bring the passengers home in the next two weeks.
*In total, the UK government says, there could be 800,000-plus Monarch passengers and 2,100 staff affected by the airline's failure. About 1,800 staff lost their jobs on Monday.

Budget airlines 'poisoning' their own wells?

Europe's budget airlines may be 'poisoning their own wells' by focusing on keeping costs as low as possible and not 'nurturing' key staff including pilots, commentators say.

Many airlines won't pay for pilot training - which in Europe can cost over GBP100,000 in total - and coupled with university debts and low entry-level pilot wages, it can be difficult for would-be pilots to qualify. They can apply for bank loans, but can't work as a pilot in the year it takes to gain their Airline Transport Pilots Licence (ATPL), which is needed to fly a commercial jet.
Also, young pilots at budget airlines (such as Monarch*, which failed earlier this week) may only be paid between GBP20,000 and GBP22,000 a year.
And of course, although there is a global pilot shortage, pilot licences are not transferable between aircraft types; pilots can't switch from one to another - they have to retrain to fly each new jet type.

Monarch passengers 'coming home'

By Monday evening October 2, the repatriation of UK passengers from their holiday destinations had begun, with some 12,000 passengers flying into UK airports.
Officials have chartered about 30 planes to bring the passengers home in the next two weeks.
*In total, the UK government says, there could be 800,000-plus Monarch passengers and 2,100 staff affected by the airline's failure. About 1,800 staff lost their jobs on Monday.