Aeroflot flies to Australia/NZ on code share

Aeroflot is now flying to Sydney and Melbourne, Australia and Auckland, NZ from Moscow via Guangzhou on a code-share arrangement with China Southern Airlines. The carriers are both members of the SkyTeam alliance and have code shared on several routes since 2008, writes Kelvin King.

 While China Southern’s heavy-traffic Guangzhou/Christchurch route – enhanced for the summer season - might also seem a contender for Aeroflot code sharing, it is possible the whole arrangement might be relatively short-lived.

China Southern is contemplating a move to oneworld, at least partly driven by oneworld member American Airlines buying a stake in the Chinese giant. The possibility of such a move is viewed askance by existing oneworld member Cathay Pacific, which is rumoured to be looking at a possible shift towards Star Alliance if China Southern joins oneworld. Star includes many of its close partners such as Air NZ.

However, that in turn might be given the thumbs down by oneworld partner Qatar Airways, which recently became a major shareholder in Cathay, primarily for strategic networking. While Qatar keeps at arm’s length from governance of carriers it has invested in, it is unlikely to be enthused about losing the advantage of seamless partnerships.

Australia’s International Air Services Commission (IASC) is considering an application by Qantas to utilise its NZ route capacity on a code-share basis with SriLankan Airlines. Qantas already has similar code- share arrangements on trans-Tasman services with several other carriers. It also code shares with SriLankan on other routes. SriLankan recently commenced non-stop flights Colombo/Melbourne.

While Qantas holds no-limit capacity on the NZ route, code-share requests routinely involve IASC consulting with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Code-share approval is usually given if it does not reduce competition materially and especially if the code-share partner is unlikely to operate services with its own metal. Sometimes the IASC stipulates sales and marketing arrangements. Both Qantas and SriLankan are oneworld members.

Last month the IASC approved code sharing by Qantas and fellow oneworld member Latam on QF services between Australia and Hong Kong/Singapore. This arrangement further strengthens Australia’s role as an Asia/Australia/South America hub.

At the end of August IASC gave the green light to Qantas/El Al codesharing on the Hong Kong, Thai and South Africa routes.

Earlier in the year several other codeshare arrangements involving Australian international carriers were approved or renewed

Aeroflot flies to Australia/NZ on code share

Aeroflot is now flying to Sydney and Melbourne, Australia and Auckland, NZ from Moscow via Guangzhou on a code-share arrangement with China Southern Airlines. The carriers are both members of the SkyTeam alliance and have code shared on several routes since 2008, writes Kelvin King.

 While China Southern’s heavy-traffic Guangzhou/Christchurch route – enhanced for the summer season - might also seem a contender for Aeroflot code sharing, it is possible the whole arrangement might be relatively short-lived.

China Southern is contemplating a move to oneworld, at least partly driven by oneworld member American Airlines buying a stake in the Chinese giant. The possibility of such a move is viewed askance by existing oneworld member Cathay Pacific, which is rumoured to be looking at a possible shift towards Star Alliance if China Southern joins oneworld. Star includes many of its close partners such as Air NZ.

However, that in turn might be given the thumbs down by oneworld partner Qatar Airways, which recently became a major shareholder in Cathay, primarily for strategic networking. While Qatar keeps at arm’s length from governance of carriers it has invested in, it is unlikely to be enthused about losing the advantage of seamless partnerships.

Australia’s International Air Services Commission (IASC) is considering an application by Qantas to utilise its NZ route capacity on a code-share basis with SriLankan Airlines. Qantas already has similar code- share arrangements on trans-Tasman services with several other carriers. It also code shares with SriLankan on other routes. SriLankan recently commenced non-stop flights Colombo/Melbourne.

While Qantas holds no-limit capacity on the NZ route, code-share requests routinely involve IASC consulting with the Australian Competition and Consumer Commission. Code-share approval is usually given if it does not reduce competition materially and especially if the code-share partner is unlikely to operate services with its own metal. Sometimes the IASC stipulates sales and marketing arrangements. Both Qantas and SriLankan are oneworld members.

Last month the IASC approved code sharing by Qantas and fellow oneworld member Latam on QF services between Australia and Hong Kong/Singapore. This arrangement further strengthens Australia’s role as an Asia/Australia/South America hub.

At the end of August IASC gave the green light to Qantas/El Al codesharing on the Hong Kong, Thai and South Africa routes.

Earlier in the year several other codeshare arrangements involving Australian international carriers were approved or renewed