Airlines offering cheaper pilot training programs

Pilots say flight training costs of US$70,000-plus are the key reason why flight schools are struggling to win new students, while some airlines have started paying for pilot training.
“Trainees have to consider where the cash will come from, be it huge bank loans or turning to the ‘bank of mum and dad,'” said Brian Strutton, general secretary of the British Airline Pilots Association.
 
Eight months ago, training company CAE forecast that the global commercial aviation industry would need an additional 255,000 pilots by 2027 to sustain rapid growth, but added that more than half of the pilots needed have not yet begun training.
 
The shortages are affecting almost every airline and even military recruitment.
 
Europe's Air France is one of the carriers that plan programs where they will pay for pilots' training and then hire them, while the Philippines' Cebu Pacific is sponsoring 240 trainees, though in that case, pilots will repay costs through salary deductions.
 
Other 'wrinkles' also are being trialled, such as discounting training costs and shortening training times.
 
And plane makers Boeing and Airbus say they will expand their range of flight training products and services.

 

Airlines offering cheaper pilot training programs

Pilots say flight training costs of US$70,000-plus are the key reason why flight schools are struggling to win new students, while some airlines have started paying for pilot training.
“Trainees have to consider where the cash will come from, be it huge bank loans or turning to the ‘bank of mum and dad,'” said Brian Strutton, general secretary of the British Airline Pilots Association.
 
Eight months ago, training company CAE forecast that the global commercial aviation industry would need an additional 255,000 pilots by 2027 to sustain rapid growth, but added that more than half of the pilots needed have not yet begun training.
 
The shortages are affecting almost every airline and even military recruitment.
 
Europe's Air France is one of the carriers that plan programs where they will pay for pilots' training and then hire them, while the Philippines' Cebu Pacific is sponsoring 240 trainees, though in that case, pilots will repay costs through salary deductions.
 
Other 'wrinkles' also are being trialled, such as discounting training costs and shortening training times.
 
And plane makers Boeing and Airbus say they will expand their range of flight training products and services.